• Be patient, observant and wait for the action. Close encounters with large wild animals are rare, brief, unexpected and often anti-climatic. Do not violate their space, restrict their movements or invade their privacy. Do not restrain snakes or insects or approach a bird’s nest. Never harm your subject in any way and obey the rules of nature and that of the Kaziranga National Park.
  • Read up on the subject before hand. And experiment with your camera and read the owner’s manual very carefully. Interact with officials, conservationists, forest guards and villagers of Kaziranga National Park. Knowledge will give you an edge and better images will be the result.
  • Try to frame your image according to your own aesthetics, anchor your camera to ensure sharp images, try to include a little background so your subject looks natural. Don’t set up shots by moving insects, or placing flowers out of context.
  • Try to understand wildlife behaviour to anticipate a picture opportunity at Kaziranga National Park. Patience and perseverance will be always rewarded.
  • Avoid taking pictures from moving vehicles, or even from vehicles whose engines are running. Even fast shutter speeds will show up camera shake.
  • If you have just one or two frames remaining, your battery is exhausted or your data card full, take action early to avoid disappointment. The most amazing wildlife shots have been lost by those who ignored this advice.
  • Shoot more rather than fewer frames. This will almost certainly result in a choice of better images on your return.
  • If you are riding on an elephant, remember to take into account the steep angle of view and camera shake. Use a fast shutter speed, follow the rhythm of the elephant, shoot when the animal is steady.
  • Color fidelity and lightning are vital. Side-lit and backlit scenes can be dramatic. Angular light (morning and evening), spotlight (light shafts shining through canopy), soft, diffused light can make the difference between a good and great photograph. Light conditions between 7.30 and 9.30 am and between 3.30 and 5 pm at Kaziranga National Park are great for nature photography.
  • Keep the subject at the focal point of the frame. Try to get the catch light in your subject’s eye. Leave breathing space near the head of your subject, less behind its tail might be fine. Similarly, by and large, leave less space in the foreground than the background. Experiment with different angles,elevations and perspectives.
  • Enhance contrast by framing a darker subject against a well lit background, or a light subject against a dark background.
  • Use a tripod, shoulder pod, monopod or chest pod to avoid camera shake.
  • Use the slowest possible shutter speed for still subjects such as landscapes. You can do so by placing camera on a rock or tripod. To avoid shake caused by the pressing of the click button, use a self timer. Use the fastest possible shutter speeds for moving objects.
  • Protect your cameras, lenses and film from heat, dust and moisture and handle the equipment with respect. Follow a daily maintenance routine of brushing and cleaning lenses and accessories.
  • Keep back up batteries and chargers. Check all of your equipment before going into the field by shooting frames in different conditions at home.
  • Do not forget to enjoy the forest and its wildlife. Your eye is the best lens and your brain the best hard-disk.