Pilgrimage Tourism in Assam, Temples of Assam, Hajo Temple Town in Assam

Hajo is a small temple town in the Kamrup district of Lower Assam, which is well known for its ambiance of inter-religious tolerance, fellow feeling and co-operation. There are several temples and shrines here which are sacred to different sects of Hinduism – Vasihnavism, Saivism and Saktism – the most prominent among them being the Hayagriva Madhava temple located on a hill-top. Hindus of all sects visit these temples and offer prayers. Bhutiyas belonging to the Mahayana sect of Buddhism consider the Hayagriva temple as a Buddhist shrine and identify the deity as Mahamuni (Buddha). At one time Bhutiya pilgrims used to visit Hajo as an act of piety. On another hill-top in Hajo is the Dargah of a famous Pir, and is regarded as one of the holiest spots of Muslims in Assam and is popularly known as the Poa Makka (Quarter Mecca). The shrine attracts devotee from both the Muslim and the Hindu communities. The atmosphere of communal understanding and open-mindedness is reflected also in certain items of oral tradition of the neighborhood.

During the Muslim invasion of Assam, Hajo happened to be an important Military outpost of the Muslim forces. many Muslim soldiers had married local ladies and settled down in and around Hajo. Legends and anecdotes centering round Muslim military officers, common soldiers as well as holy men are retained in the public memory of this area even today.

A ballad, popularly known as Haidor Gazir Git (the Song of Haidor Gazi), has been found to be current in several versions in some villages surrounding Hajo. Some of the singers happen to be Hindus of high caste, who are full of sympathy for the hero of the ballad, a Muslim. According to it, a Muslim warrior named Haidor Gazi had come to Hajo as a member of the army of the Muslim Nawab. After the military expedition the Nawab came to a conclusion, some members of the army, including Haidor Gazi, stayed back. Haidor Gazi married a local maiden, Kanchanmati by name, and became a denizen of the locality. After sometime, the military expedition was resumed and Haidor Gazi received summons to join the troop as a cavalryman. Although Hiador Gazi was most reluctant to join the war, he had to yield to the orders of the military masters. He left for the war and got killed at the hands of the enemy.

“Each version of the ballad Haidor Gazi contains a different refrain. The refrain of the Hajo version is significant, which bears the stamp of religious tolerance and secular feelings of the people.”

Jungleideas welcomes you to the land where Faith Unites – ‘HAJO’ – the Holy Land of Hindus, Muslims and the Buddhists, the State of Assam, Incredible India!

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Pilgrimage Tourism in Assam, Temples of Assam, Hajo Temple Town in Assam
The Hayagriva Madhava Temple

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Pilgrimage Tourism in Assam, Temples of Assam, Hajo Temple Town in Assam
The Flight of Stairs to the Temple

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Pilgrimage Tourism in Assam, Temples of Assam, Hajo Temple Town in Assam
Shrine at the Hayagriva Madhava Temple

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Pilgrimage Tourism in Assam, Temples of Assam, Hajo Temple Town in Assam
The Beautiful Pond laden with Turtles and Fishes

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Assam Pilgrimage Tourism, Assam Eco Tourism, Homestays in Guwahati
Fron View of The Shrine of Poa Makka

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Assam Pilgrimage Tourism, Assam Eco Tourism, Homestays in Guwahati
The Shrine of Poa Makka

Recommended Itinerary for your Visit: Temple Tour of Hajo, Assam

Advertisements