Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Sattriya Dance of Majuli Island. Image assamtimes.org

‘To reach God all you have to do is to utter his name’ – this is a simple yet very powerful philosophy to seek divinity in a living tradition of Assam. And Srimanta Shankardeva, the 16th century saint-reformer of Assam was the founder of this tradition. His teaching ‘Ekasarana Dharma’ still echoes in serenity across the numerous Satras (monasteries) and Naamghars (community prayer halls) of this land. In Namghars, people not only sit and recite the name of Lord Krishna, but also use it as a community theatre, village court and afternoon meeting place for women.

The preaching initiated by the Great reformer of Assam, Srimanta Sankardeva, are practiced widely across the State in two unique institutions – the Satras and the Namghars, both of which are deeply associated with the social, cultural as well as religious life of the Assamese society. The Satra institution is one of the most distinguishing feature of Assamese Neo-Vaisnavism Cult. The Satra, literally meaning ‘holy areas’, is a network of decentralized monasteries each headed by a Guru (teacher) designated as the Satradhikar.  The Namghars which are found across the State of Assam are an ‘extended wing’ or a ‘miniature replica’ of the Satra institution.

The Bhowana performances in the Satras and Namghars of Assam simply transport a visitor into a transcendental state of peace, with stories about Lord Krishna, Vishnu, Rama and other related Gods becoming almost real-life in the central stage on the ground around which sits the audience. Assam has over 500 big and small Satras, the most important of them being located at Nagaon, Majuli and Barpeta in Assam.

1| The Bordowa Satra at Nagaon ~ Awesome Assam

Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Bordowa Satra at Nagaon

Srimanta Shankardeva, who had spearheaded the Neo-Vaishnava Bhakti movement in Assam and its neighborhood, was the harbinger of an extra-ordinary resurgence in the life of this region. The movement had sample ramifications – spiritual, social, cultural, literacy and artistic. Saint and visionary, poet and dramatist, musician and painter – Srimanta Sankardeva was a many-splendorous personality. Ably and enthusiastically assisted by his equally gifted spiritual heir Madhavdeva, Sankardeva galvanized the diverse ethnic elements of the society into a unified and inspired mass with the lofty ideal of service to God through service to humanity. The Sankardeva movement broke down the irrational barriers of caste, creed and ritualism, and brought the newly emergent society into close touch with the finest spiritual and cultural values that have been the hallmarks of the Indian Civilization.

It was largely due to the deep and pervasive influence of the teachings of Srimanta Sankardeva that the Assamese society had come to acquire certain outstanding traits that still mark it out from those of most parts of India.

The Bordowa Satra in the present Nagaon district of Assam was founded by Srimanta Sankaradeva. It is named as SRI SRI BATADRAVA THAN. Srimanta Sankaradeva set up the first ever Kirtanghar here in 1468. The importance of this place is also derived from the fact that the Religious Guru was born at Alipukhuri – Bordowa in 1449. After returning from his 12 year long pilgrimage in 1493, he started preaching his Vaishnavite religious ideas here regularly and systematically. His ideas were based on Bhagavata Purana.

The Bordowa Satra is the first Satra set up by Srimanta Sankaradeva for propagation of EKA SARANA NAMA DHARMA founded by him. He also built the ‘Monikut’ together with Kirtanghar or Namghar and the ‘Cari-Hati’ (four clusters of quarters) for accommodation of his disciples. This full-fledged Than complex came up in 1509. Simhasana or Guru Asana (the Altar of God) was placed in the Monikut with the holy scripture ‘Bhagavata’ on it without any idol.

Srimanta Sankaradeva used to practice his religious activities everyday at the Kirtanghar along with his follower devotees. His religion EKA SARANA NAMA DHARMA is very simple. There is no unnecessary ritual in his order. Srimanta Sankaradeva advocated ‘EKA DEVA, EKA SEVA, EKA BINEY NAHI KEWA’, which means one should worship none but one God, who is Lord Krishna. Bordowa became the center of his religious activities. As such, Batadrava has been regarded as the Dvitiya Vaikuntha (second heaven). Srimanta Sankaradeva used to write scriptures sitting below one Shilikha (Myrobalan) tree near the Kirtanghar. That tree is still alive even after over six hundred years, which is a wonder. Devotees from all over the world come here to see this sacred tree also.

Srimanta Sankaradeva left Bordowa in 1516 along with his followers consequent upon incessant conflicts between his kinsmen and some other people. He spent the remaining half of his life in Rowta, Gangmow,Dhuwahata, Patbausi, Kochbehar etc. Later his grandson Chaturbhuj’s wife Kanaklata rediscovered the Bordowa Satra with the help of the Ahom and Tiwa people. She restored the Than to the previous glory.


2| The Barpeta Satra at Barpeta ~ Awesome Assam

Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Barpeta Satra at Barpeta in Assam

Established by Assamese Vaishnavite monasteries, the ‘Satras’ are Institutional Centers that propagate Neo Vaishnavism across the State of Assam. An initiative of the Kings of the Ahom Dynasty, these ‘Satras’ house hundreds of celibate and non-celibate ‘Bhokots’ (Monks), hold vast lands and are repositories of religious and cultural relics and artifacts.

Out of the several ‘Satras’ spread across Assam, we have already mentioned about one the most noteworthy ‘the Auniati Satra’ of the river Island of Majuli and its main branch at North Guwahati. In this chapter we bring forth to you another important ‘Satra’ of Assam – the ‘Barpeta Satra’

Established in 1583 AD by the disciple of Sri Sri Srimanta Shankardeva, Sri Sri Madhavdeva the ‘Barpeta Satra’ is located on the quaint town of Barpeta at Barpeta District in Lower Assam. Sri Sri Madhav Deva founded the ‘Barpeta Satra’ five hundred years (500) years back and stayed here for eight (8) long years, where he wrote some of his best known literature’s. For taking his responsibility as a disciple of Sri Srimanta Sankardev, he left the ‘Satra’ transferring the associated responsibilities to his disciple Sri Mathura Das Burha Ata, who later took care of the ‘Satra’ and he became the first ‘Satria’ of the ‘Barpeta Satra’.

It was Sri Mathura Das Burha Ata who systematized the administration of the ‘Barpeta Satra’ leading to development of the institution and the region of Barpeta. A democratic system was introduced which is effective till today. Large number of followers come to Barpeta and accept the Vaishnavate faith irrespective of their caste (high or low in society) that has created an egalitarian Society. This practice has led to the establishment of a new work culture among the followers. The ‘Satra’ has several buildings. The huge front gate is called ‘Batsora’, the main ‘Kirtanghar’ is where prayers or ‘Nam Kirtan’ are performed is an architectural splendor located at the center that was earlier built as a ‘Kutcha’ house. It was later built with concrete and big-pillars were erected. The walls were decorated with beautiful paintings of Hindu Gods in 1952. At the Satra, the ‘Bhokots’ (Monks) discussed all kinds of problems at the ‘Jagmohan Ghar’. In the ‘Bhajghar’ an oil  lamp has been continuously burning for more than 500 years and is called the ‘Akhay banti’.

The ‘Barpeta Satra’ is truly an Architectural Marvel and a magnificent sight to the eyes of its beholder. The Doors of the ‘Satra’ are made of Silver and a visit to this ‘Satra’ will leave anyone mesmerized!


3| The Auniati Satra at Majuli Island ~ Awesome Assam

Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Auniati Satra at Majuli Island

Established by Assamese Vaishnavite monasteries, the Satras are Institutional Centers that propagate Neo Vaishnavism across the State of Assam. An initiative of the Kings of the Ahom Dynasty, these Satras house hundreds of celibate and non-celibate ‘Bhokots’ (Monks), hold vast lands and are repositories of religious and cultural relics and artifacts.

One mentionable Satra in the State of Assam is the ‘Sri Sri Auniati Satra’ of Majuli established by Ahom King Jayaddhaja Singha in 1653 AD. The ‘Sri Sri Auniati Satra’ is the one that occupied the highest position amongst the various Satras of Assam. The slightly elevated land of the World’s Largest Inhabited River Island of Majuli was full of ‘Auni Paan’ (a kind of betel creeper plant). The term ‘Ati’ means elevated place and hence the name ‘Auniati Satra’ came into being.

The idol which receives daily worship in the ‘Satra Temple’ (Manikuta) is the idol of Lord Krishna called Govinda. This idol was originally brought from Jagannath Kshetra from Puri in Orissa and installed here with all the Vedic religious rituals. Apart from the main idol, there are also other idols for worship here. There are twelve branches of this famous ‘Satra’ in various parts of Assam.

With around 550 residents of udasin vaishnavs, the Sri Sri Auniati Satra established at Majuli in 1663 A.D., has been the epicenter of the Vaishnavism and Satriya culture in Assam. In addition to the regular holy practices in the Satra, numerous literary pursuits like  biographical works of the Vaishnavite Saints, cultural compositions of ‘bhaonas’, ‘Satriya songs and dances’, religious publications and preaching related to religious and societal works are the core activities of the Auniati Satra. The Satriya ritual activities of the Auniati Satra include Sharana, Bhajan, Nam-Prasanga, religious festivals and related devotional performances for the pleasure of Lord Govinda. The Satradhikar, Deka Satradhikar, Govindapuriya with theirvaishnava disciples lead an udasin life (celibacy and purely devoted to the thinking of God).

The main prayer in the Auniati Satra continues from morning till evening everyday and is being continued without interruption for more than last 350 years. The Satriya performances are usually a regular devotion to Lord Govinda by the vaishnavs in the Satra in the general prayer hall (Naam-ghar). In addition, there are also special performances devoted to Lord in presence/ supervision of the Satradhikar on various occasions and festivals. These festivals are Paal-naam, Raas-leela, Janmastami, Holi, Dewali, Bohag Bihu (Assamese New Year), Kati Bihu etc. Thedeath anniversaries of the past Satradhikaras and the Vaishnavite Gurus are also ritually celebrated.

The Satriya performances of the Auniati Satra include various forms of prayers, dances and religious theatrical shows based on the great Indian epics of Puranas, Vedas, Ramayana, Mahabharata, Srimad-Bhagawat etc. The foremost dance performances of SriSri Auniati Satra are Natua, Apsara, Sutradhar, Ozapali (Panchali and Dulari), Sali, Jumura, Krishna Gopi Nritya, Maati Akhara andGayan-Bayan. The Songs (Satriya Geeta) includes Gayana Geet, Ozapali Geet, Janmastami Geet, Raas-Geet, Gopal Bairagya Geet, Raja Gharia Geet, Guru Bandana, Deva Bandana & Natarmajar Geet. Naama , Hiya Nam, Deeha Nam, Sabahua Nam, Bairagi Nam, Nam Mangal, Ghosa Mangal, Ras Mangal,Bairaginam, Barnam etcOne of the significant festivals of Sri Sri Auniati Satra is Palnaam, commencing from the 25th day of Assamese Kartika Month to the 29th day of the same. Thousands of followers (disciples) gather in the main Majuli satra for offering their prayers during these days. 

Other major activities include the spiritual guidance (preaching) called Sharan, Bhajan and Malamantradan under the direct supervision of the Satradhikar or his delegates. The Auniati Satra with its head quarter in Majuli has two more focal establishments in North Guwahati and Kaliapani (Teok) with more than 1 million followers across the country. The Satra upholds the pride of performing cultural Satriya programmes as invited delegation across the country including National programmes like Republic day celebration at New Delhi, presentation at Rashtrapati Bhawan (for the President of India), National Cultural festivals at National Museum, New Delhi, Jodhpur, Rajashthan, Kanchipuram, Tamilnadu etc. etc.


4| The Samaguri Satra at Majuli Island ~ Awesome Assam

Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Samaguri Satra at Majuli Island

Mask making is one of the most famous traditional crafts still practiced in Majuli. It is mainly practiced by the ‘Satras’. The ‘Samaguri Satra’ has worldwide acclaim in making exquisite masks. It has been practiced by the ‘Bhakats’ here for centuries. Masks are an integral part of Sattriya culture. Traditionally, masks were used for religious dance and drama. They were conceptualized as a tool by Shrimanta Shankaradeva to make and depict the characters of ‘Srimad Bhagwat’ to the devotees. Masks helped to provide a physical form to the puranic characters. They also helped people to associate with the character and expressions of the mythical heroes. Shri Hem Chandra Goswami at the Samaguri Satra of Majuli has been practicing this art since the last 20 years and he continues to train artisans of the island to learn the art of mask making thus keeping alive this tradition.


5| The Kamalabari Satra at Majuli Island ~ Awesome Assam

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The Kamalabari Satra at Majuli Island

The Kamalabari Satra is considered as one of the most influential Satra of Assam. It has been not only the center of Vaishnavism but also cultural center of the region. The Kamalabari Satra has been a center of art, cultural, literature and classical studies for centuries. Due to the damages done by flood, one branch of the Satra is recently established in the mainland Assam. But the a branch of the original Kamalabari Satra still continues from the Majuli island in the midst the river Brahmaputra.

The Kamalabari Satra has been producing great figures in Assam the cultural sector. It is the home to legendary musicians and performing artists like the Late Maniram Dutta, Muktiyar Bayan and Raseswar Saikia Barbayan, who contributed greatly towards the conferment of the Classical status upon Satriya Dance. The disciples and artists trained in the Satra still performs nationally and internationally today are well known for creating sculptures of mythological characters and also crafting beautiful boats.


6| The Garmur Satra at Majuli Island ~ Awesome Assam

Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Garmur Satra at Majuli Island

Garamur Satra is one of the four major royal Satras of the Majuli Island. The name of the Satra has been derived from two words – Garh and mur – compounded in to one. In Assamese language Garh ,means embankment and Mur means head. The compound word therefore,means the end point of an embankment (Garh). Records say that the Satra was established at a place which was located on the extreme (northern) end of an embankment called Chowatalar Garh built by the Ahom King Pratap Singha (1603-1641). The remains of that Garh approaching the Satra in the southeastern direction could be seen till recent decades.

Garamur Satra is the third among four Satras of Assam that had received royal patronage of the Ahom Kings and was established in the third decade of the 17th century. Another major center of the Sattriya culture including fine arts and performing arts, the Garamur Satra is also rich in various antiques including several wooden idols and manuscripts written on the bark of the sanchi tree. Raas is the most important festival. Two former Satradhikars of Garamur Satra, Pitambar Deva Goswami and Krishna Chandra Goswami were eminent freedom fighters who set an example that loving the motherland is also form of spirituality. Both were also imprisoned by the British.


7| The Auniati Satra at Guwahati ~ Awesome Assam

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The Auniati Satra at Guwahati

The ‘Sri Sri Auniati Satra’ at Guwahati is a four-sided enclosed area with four gateways (Karapat). Centrally placed in this enclosure is a rectangular prayer-hall called the ‘Namghar’ aligned in the east-west direction. On its eastern side there is an additional independent structure called the ‘Manikut’ or the ‘Jewel-house’, the Sanctum Santorum, in which the ‘Asana’ – a wooden tetradehral structure with four carved lions is placed containing the main object of worship (usually a copy of the Bhagavat Purana in manuscript or an idol). The ‘Namghar’ is surrounded by four straight rows of huts, called ‘Hati’, in which the monks (Bhokots) reside. The ‘Adhikara’ and other high officers of the ‘Satra’ reside in the Eastern ‘Hatis’.


8| The Dhekiakhowa Bornamghor at Jorhat ~ Awesome Assam

Satras of Majuli, Majuli River Island, Awesome Assam, Assam Tourism
The Dhekiakhowa Bornamghor at Jorhat

Spread across 13 bighas of land, the Dhekiakhowa Bornamghar was established in 1461 AD at Dhekiakhowa in Jorhat district in Assam by Sri Sri Madhavdeva, the disciple of Sri Sri Sankardev (the preacher and propounder of Vaishnavism in Assam and also the Father figure of Assamese Culture). Sri Sri Madhavdeva had kindled an earthen lamp in 1461, which has been burning since then being religiously re-fueled by the priests till date. This Lamp holds the World Record of being the Oldest Burning Oil Lamp in the World. The main pillar of the Dhekiakhowa Bornamghar is made of a Sal tree.

According to the story, Mahapurush Madhavadeva, while spreading the Vaishnava faith came to stay in this small and poor village. He took shelter for the night at the hut of an old woman, who served him rice with dhekia xaak – a delicious fern. The old woman was very embarrassed to have served a saint guru like this, but the guru was immensely pleased by the dinner. He established a Namghar and gave the woman the responsibility of lighting the earthen lamp to the old woman. Because of this anecdote, the Namghar is called the Dhekiakhowa Bornamghar; here bor meaning big!

Devotees throng this Namghar from all over Assam in the sacred month of Bhada (August-September), to observe the death anniversaries of both the saints – Srimanta Sankardeva and Madhavadeva.


9| The Dakhinpat Satra at Majuli Island ~ Awesome Assam

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The Dakhinpat Satra in Majuli ~ Majuli ~ Assam ~ India

The Dakhinpat Satra was established by Banamalideva under the patronage of Jayadhwaja Simha in 1654 AD, and is an important treasure house of art and culture. Apart from conserving and propagating various Sattriya dance forms like Oja-pali, Natuwa, Raja-ghariya nritya, Indrabhishek Nritya, Raas Nritya, this Satra has also preserved several ragas and talas of sattriya culture that are not to be found in other Satras.

Raas Leela is the largest festival organized by the Dakhinpat Satra in November, apart from a five day Palnaam and Raas kirtana. Its principal deity is known as Jadavrai, and has 15 other deities, all said to be different forms of Krishna. A collection of the Bhagwad in manuscript form which Shankardeva had gifted in  a golden pin to another disciple Damodardeva in 1579 is the most important of numerous artifacts in this collection.


10| Bengena-ati Satra at Majuli Island ~ Awesome Assam

Yet another significant Satra at Majuli, the Bengena-ati Satra was established by Muraridev, a nephew of Srimanta Shankardeva.

An advance center of performing art, Bengena-ati Satra is a storehouse of antiques of cultural importance. It preserves the royal robes decorated with golden beads belonging to the Ahom King Swargadeo Gadadhar Simha and a golden umbrella.


Considered as the biggest River Island in the World, Majuli has also been the hub of Assamese neo-vaishnavite culture, initiated around 16th century by the great Assamese saint-reformer Srimanta Shankardeva and his principal disciple Madhadeva. These Satras or Monasteries that came up in the subsequent period in Majuli Island are not only centers of spiritual discourses, but are always agog with Bhaona performances, devotional music and songs and various other cultural activities. Visitors can stay in the baha – traditional dormitories of the celibate monks, in the premises of the Satras and becomes part of the several round of daily prayers. Once Majuli had over 55 Satras; river-bank erosion caused by the Brahmaputra has taken away over 30 of them; only 22 exist at Majuli Island today.

The preaching initiated by the Great reformer of Assam, Srimanta Sankardeva, are practiced widely across the State in two unique institutions – the Satras and the Namghars, both of which are deeply associated with the social, cultural as well as religious life of the Assamese society. The Satra institution is one of the most distinguishing feature of Assamese Neo-Vaisnavism Cult. The Satra, literally meaning ‘holy areas’, is a network of decentralized monasteries each headed by a Guru (teacher) designated as the Satradhikar.  The Namghars which are found across the State of Assam are an ‘extended wing’ or a ‘miniature replica’ of the Satra institution.

Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahati
The Barpeta Satra at Barpeta near Guwahati in Assam

The Satras and the Namghars both, are basically a place of religious worship. It is at these places of worship in Assam where people gather to sing praised of the Lord and seek spiritual solace. The most important area inside the premises of these institutions is the Kirtanghar. The Kirtanghar is the nerve center of the entire place generally located in the center of the premises of the Satra that is surrounded with houses for the devotees within the compound its four sides. It is a long and open hall, where the devotees sit together to sing the glory of God. There is no idol in the altar, but only a book, generally the ‘Bhagavata Gita’, symbolizing God. In addition to prayers and cultural functions, religious discourses are also held in the Kirtanghar.

Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahatii
Inside the Namghar of the Barpeta Satra where the Kirtanghar is located

The first stage of evolution of the Satras in Assam began with Srimanta Sankardeva. However, it was during the time of the equally able disciples of Sankardeva i.e. Madhavdeva and Damordeva that the Satra institution attained the glorious phase of its growth. The architectural structure of the Satra also received the final shape during this period. It thus came to possess the prayer hall (Namghar) and the Manikut with the wooden throne (Singhasana) attached to the former and containing a sacred scripture. By the middle of the 17th century, the Satra institution, firmly established itself and the royal authority had to accord recognition to Srimanta Sankardeva’s faith. Subsequently, the Ahom kings and nobles accepted Neo-Vaisnavism. The Satras played a great role in the social life of the people. One component of the Satra institution, the Kirtanghar, became an integral part of every Assamese village in Assam over time. It became popular by another name too, the Namghar. Over time it came to be an integral part of every Hindu village of Assam. As a result every Assamese village came under the religious influence of one Satra or the other and its influence even penetrated gradually into the neighbouring tribal areas. The Satras gave Assam a rich religious literature, besides reviving and popularizing the art of classical music and dance.

The establishment of the village Namghar came about with the idea of popularizing the Neo-Vaisnavite faith to the masses. The Namghar came to serve as a forum of not only religious but also socio-cultural activities of the community. The village Namghar has for the last four hundred years has been serving as the village public hall: it is at once a village prayer hall, a cultural center and a ‘village court’, thereby providing a common forum for the villagers to assemble in an atmosphere of goodwill and cooperation. The Namghar becomes the venue for congregational chanting of prayers, singing of Borgeets or classical devotional songs composed by Srimanta Sankardeva and his disciple Madhavdeva and enactment of Bhoanas – a cultural art event on various occasions. No discrimination is made in terms of class or caste in distributing roles in the Bhaonas held at the Namghar.

Jungleideas welcomes you to India’s North East to witness the Grandeur of the Neo-Vaishnavite Institutional Centers and the Prayer Halls of the Assamese Community – the ‘Satras’ and ‘Namghars’, the State of Assam, Incredible India!

Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahati
Home to Oldest Burning Oil Lamp in the World – the Dhekiakhuwa Bornamghar at Jorhat
Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahati
The Entrance to the Auniati Satra at Guwahati in Assam
Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahati
Inside the Auniati Satra Namghar at Guwahati in Assam
Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahati
The Namghar of the Auniati Satra
Satras of Majuli, Satras at Ahom Dynasty, Satras of Assam, Namghar in Assam, Barpeta Satra, Auniata Satra Majuli, Satra Guwahati
The Margherita Namghar at Margherita
Satras of Assam, Satras of Ahom Dynasty, Neo Vaishnavism of Assam, Majuli Island Satras
The ‘Monikut’ within the premises of the Bordowa Satra in Assam
Satras of Assam, Satras of Ahom Dynasty, Neo Vaishnavism of Assam, Majuli Island Satras
The ‘Namghar’ or the place of Worship at the premises of the Bordowa Satra in Assam
Satras of Assam, Satras of Ahom Dynasty, Neo Vaishnavism of Assam, Majuli Island Satras
Age Speaks ~ a 90 year old Neo Vaisnavite Monk standing with the 600 year old tree at the Bordowa Satra in Assam
Satras of Majuli, Ahom Dynasty Satras, Majuli River Island, Assam Satras
The Auniati Satra at Majuli River Island
Satras of Majuli, Ahom Dynasty Satras, Majuli River Island, Assam Satras
The Uttar Kamalabari Satra at Majuli Island
Satras of Majuli, Ahom Dynasty Satras, Majuli River Island, Assam Satras
The Garmur Satra at Majuli Island
Satras of Majuli, Ahom Dynasty Satras, Majuli River Island, Assam Satras
The Prayer Hall at the Garmur Satra in majuli
Satras of Majuli, Ahom Dynasty Satras, Majuli River Island, Assam Satras
The Uttar Kamalabari Satra at Majuli River Island
Satras of Majuli, Ahom Dynasty Satras, Majuli River Island, Assam Satras
The Museum at the Garmur Satra in Majuli River Island